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Heart Failure: Many drugs can cause or worsen it.

Heart Failure: Many drugs can cause or worsen it.

Commonly used medications and nutritional supplements may cause or worsen heart failure (HF), according to the first scientific statement from the American Heart Association to provide guidance on avoiding drug–drug or drug–condition interactions for people with HF (Circulation 2016 Jul 11. [Epub ahead of print]).
The statement provides comprehensive information about specific drugs and supplements that may have serious unintended consequences for HF patients.

Patients with HF have, on average, five or more separate medical conditions and take seven or more prescription medications daily, often prescribed by different health care providers. According to the statement, medications can cause problems in several ways: being toxic to heart muscle cells or changing how the heart muscle contracts; interacting with medications used to treat HF so that some of their benefits are lost; and containing more sodium than advised for patients with HF.
“Since many of the drugs heart failure patients are taking are prescribed for conditions such as cancer, neurological conditions or infections, it is crucial but difficult for health care providers to reconcile whether a medication is interacting with heart failure drugs or making heart failure worse,” said Robert L. Page II, PharmD, MSPH, the chair of the writing committee for the new scientific statement. read more

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Family Planning: Pharm Billy Shoaga Norminated by John Hopkins

Family Planning: Pharm Billy Shoaga Norminated by John Hopkins

A Nigerian, Pharmacist Billy Shoaga has been nominated by John Hopkins for an award in family planning

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Court dismisses patent medicine dealers’ case against PCN

Court dismisses patent medicine dealers’ case against PCN

The court held that the PCN Act 1992 empowers the PCN to

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Giving Tramadol? Check That Glucose Reading!

Giving Tramadol? Check That Glucose Reading!

There have been reports of patients taking tramadol for pain requiring hospitalization because of these

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Increasing need for repellent

Increasing need for repellent

Use of insect repellents is strongly recommended by the CDC and the EPA to prevent Zika virus infection1, and other mosquito- and tickborne diseases. Mosquitoes can transmit chikungunya, dengue, West Nile, and yellow fever viruses, and malaria. Ticks can transmit Lyme disease and rickettsial diseases such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

DEET — The topical insect

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Heart Failure Guidelines Updated with Two New Drugs

Heart Failure Guidelines Updated with Two New Drugs

The American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA), and the Heart Failure Society of America have updated their heart failure guidelines to include an

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NSAIDS may play a role in preventing breast cancer

NSAIDS may play a role in preventing breast cancer

in addition to possible prevention, there may also be a role for NSAIDs in the treatment of women with established

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ALPS conference venue moved!

ALPS conference venue moved!

Dear colleagues.
PLEASE NOTE THE VENUE FOR THE ALPS CONFERENCE IS NOW AIRPORT HOTEL, OBAFEMI AWOLOWO WAY IKEJA LAGOS.
Please kindly circulate so as many ALPIANS as possible will be informed about the conference and will attend. inform all of the venue change.

Registration and collection of conference materials will commence on Tuesday 10th May at the AIRPORT hotel from 5pm , Wednesday 11th from 5pm and Thursday 12th from 9am. Only registered delegates are entitled to conference materials.

Day 1.  10th May 2016 SENSITIZATION WALK AND HEALTH SCREENING FROM LASUTH GATE TO IKEJA LGA. FIRST LADY LAGOS STATE EXPECTED TO LEAD THE WALK.
Time. 10am
DRESS CODE IS ALPS T SHIRT AND CAP.
THEY CAN BE PURCHASED AT THE VENUE FOR1500. read more

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Fake drugs: Economics graduate bags five years imprisonment

Fake drugs: Economics graduate bags five years imprisonment

Justice Faji held that the fake drugs which lacked the major anti-malaria and anti-bacteria components have serious detrimental effects on persons as well as serious

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New Recommendations for Use of Metformin in Renal Impairment

New Recommendations for Use of Metformin in Renal Impairment

These changes will allow more patients with mild to moderate renal impairment to receive metformin, which is generally the

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May & Baker to honour outstanding pharmacist

May & Baker to honour outstanding pharmacist

President, Pharmaceutical Society of Nigeria (PSN), Ahmed Yakasai, has inaugurated the selection committee for the 12th edition of the May & Baker Professional Service Awards.

The committee comprised five eminent pharmacists led by Maureen Ebigbeyi, a fellow of the Pharmaceutical Society of Nigeria and Director, Ports Inspection Directorate, National Agency for Foods, Drugs Administration and Control (NAFDAC). The winner of this year’s award is expected to be announced at the 89th Annual National Conference of the PSN, scheduled for Mina, Niger State, in November. read more

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world malaria day: The War on the Anophelines

world malaria day: The War on the Anophelines

Mosquitoes can smell human breath. They have receptors on their antennae that detect the carbon dioxide released when we exhale. Those plumes of CO2 rise into the air, acting as trails that the

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Yakassai on the move

Yakassai on the move

Lastly, we find it imperative here to appeal to Your Excellency to redress the defects in the appointment of the Director General of NAFDAC in the

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World Health Day 2016

World Health Day 2016

The number of people living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults, with most living in developing countries. Factors driving this dramatic rise include overweight and obesity, WHO announced ahead of World Health Day.
WHO is marking its annual World Health Day (7 April), which celebrates the Organization’s founding in 1948, by issuing a call for action on diabetes. In its first “Global report on diabetes”, WHO highlights the need to step up prevention and treatment of the disease.
Health-promoting environments reduce risk factors
Measures needed include expanding health-promoting environments to reduce diabetes risk factors, like physical inactivity and unhealthy diets, and strengthening national capacities to help people with diabetes receive the treatment and care they need to manage their conditions.
“If we are to make any headway in halting the rise in diabetes, we need to rethink our daily lives: to eat healthily, be physically active, and avoid excessive weight gain,” says Dr Margaret Chan, WHO Director-General. “Even in the poorest settings, governments must ensure that people are able to make these healthy choices and that health systems are able to diagnose and treat people with diabetes.”
Diabetes is a chronic, progressive noncommunicable disease (NCD) characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose (blood sugar). It occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough of the insulin hormone, which regulates blood sugar, or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces.
Key findings from WHO’s “Global report on diabetes”
Among the key findings from the “Global report on diabetes” are:
The number of people living with diabetes and its prevalence are growing in all regions of the world. In 2014, 422 million adults (or 8.5% of the population) had diabetes, compared with 108 million (4.7%) in 1980.
The epidemic of diabetes has major health and socioeconomic impacts, especially in developing countries.
In 2014, more than 1 in 3 adults aged over 18 years were overweight and more than one in 10 were obese.
The complications of diabetes can lead to heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure and lower limb amputation. For example, rates of lower limb amputation are 10 to 20 times higher for people with diabetes.
Diabetes caused 1.5 million deaths in 2012. Higher-than-optimal blood glucose caused an additional 2.2 million deaths by increasing the risks of cardiovascular and other diseases.
Many of these deaths (43%) occur prematurely, before the age of 70 years, and are largely preventable through adoption of policies to create supportive environments for healthy lifestyles and better detection and treatment of the disease.
Good management includes use of a small set of generic medicines; interventions to promote healthy lifestyles; patient education to facilitate self-care; and regular screening for early detection and treatment of complications.
Global commitments to reduce diabetes
“Many cases of diabetes can be prevented, and measures exist to detect and manage the condition, improving the odds that people with diabetes live long and healthy lives,” says Dr Oleg Chestnov, WHO’s Assistant Director-General for NCDs and Mental Health. “But change greatly depends on governments doing more, including by implementing global commitments to address diabetes and other NCDs.”
These include meeting Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target 3.4, which calls for reducing premature death from NCDs, including diabetes, by 30% by 2030. Governments have also committed to achieving 4 time-bound national commitments set out in the 2014 UN General Assembly “Outcome Document on Noncommunicable Diseases”, and attaining the 9 global targets laid out in the WHO “Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of NCDs”, which include halting the rise in diabetes and obesity.
“Around 100 years after the insulin hormone was discovered, the “Global report on diabetes” shows that essential diabetes medicines and technologies, including insulin, needed for treatment are generally available in only 1 in 3 of the world’s poorest countries,” says Dr Etienne Krug, Director of WHO’s Department for the Management of NCDs, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention. “Access to insulin is a matter of life or death for many people with diabetes. Improving access to insulin and NCD medicines in general should be a priority.”
Global efforts are underway to make medicines, including for NCDs, more available and affordable. Commitments from world leaders, including the SDGs, the 2011 “UN Political Declaration on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases”, the 2014 UN General Assembly “Outcome Document on Noncommunicable Diseases”, and the work of the UN Secretary-General’s high-level panel on access to essential medicines are aimed at improving affordability and availability of essential drugs for people living with diabetes. read more

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Seven Places Scientists are Searching for New Drugs

Seven Places Scientists are Searching for New Drugs

On a cat’s nose, on a golf course,

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Fake drug Production: A microbiologist gets 7 years jail term

The National Agency for Food, Drugs, Administration and Control, NAFDAC, on Wednesday, charged a

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PSN seeks Improved Funding for pneumonia and diarrhoea

PSN seeks Improved Funding for pneumonia and diarrhoea

President of the Pharmaceutical Society of Nigeria (PSN) Pharm.

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Losing the war against antibiotic resistance

Losing the war against  antibiotic resistance

Tackling antibiotic resistance on only one

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Now we have HIV Growing Resistant to Common Treatment

Now we have HIV Growing Resistant to Common Treatment

A man who has never gone beyond his father’s compound, might erroneously believe his father’s compound is

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Mosquito-Borne Virus May Cause Fatal Brain Infection

Mosquito-Borne Virus May Cause Fatal Brain Infection

The mosquito-borne virus chikungunya can cause

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