May & Baker to honour outstanding pharmacist

May & Baker to honour outstanding pharmacist

President, Pharmaceutical Society of Nigeria (PSN), Ahmed Yakasai, has inaugurated the selection committee for the 12th edition of the May & Baker Professional Service Awards.

The committee comprised five eminent pharmacists led by Maureen Ebigbeyi, a fellow of the Pharmaceutical Society of Nigeria and Director, Ports Inspection Directorate, National Agency for Foods, Drugs Administration and Control (NAFDAC). The winner of this year’s award is expected to be announced at the 89th Annual National Conference of the PSN, scheduled for Mina, Niger State, in November. read more

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Here comes the Answer 66th…Can quinine be used to abort?

Here comes the Answer 66th…Can quinine be used to abort?

Let me start by saying that i cannot claim to be unaware of this issue of using schweppes and andrews liver salt either as

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Can you deliver 66th: Can quinine be used to Abort?

Can you deliver 66th: Can quinine be used to Abort?

I have this question that has been bordering me. My aunthy is pregnant and the doctor prescribed quinine and artesunate for her last month, she has taken it and and she is

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world malaria day: The War on the Anophelines

world malaria day: The War on the Anophelines

Mosquitoes can smell human breath. They have receptors on their antennae that detect the carbon dioxide released when we exhale. Those plumes of CO2 rise into the air, acting as trails that the

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Here comes the answer 65th! Help this bed-wetting stop!

Here comes the answer 65th! Help this bed-wetting stop!

In bed-wetting non pharmacological approaches to treatment include

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Can you deliver 65th? Help this bed-wetting stop!

Can you deliver 65th? Help this bed-wetting stop!

Pharmacist! Pharmacist!! Pharmaaaaciiist!!! My banker neighbour’s voice jolted me out of the brain rehearsal I was doing in preparation for my presentation at the teaching hospital that morning. I wound down the glass and asked the driver to stop the car engine that was warming up to hit the street. Mrs Funto was waving a piece of paper which she also used to fan herself as she approached. I do usually tease her of her overweight.

Mrs. Funto: (panting) Am sorry, I wanted to ask you about it yesterday but you looked tired when you came back. Are you in a hurry? would it be better when you come back? read more

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Here comes the answer 64th! Antimalarial choices in first trimester

Here comes the answer 64th! Antimalarial choices in first trimester

Antimalarial drugs considered to be safe in first trimester according to WHO guideline include quinine, proguanil, clindamycin and Chloroquine. Quinine alone or in combination with clindamycin remain the drug of choice for treatment of falciparum malaria in first trimester. However,  it is recommended that ACTs or Artesunate + clindamycin can still be used in the event of quinine not available or treatment failure

if you missed the question click can you deliver 64th

for more information see Here comes the answer 21st read more

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BODY PAIN

Recall that moment when a customer 

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Can you deliver 64th: Anti malarial choices in first trimester

Can you deliver 64th: Anti malarial choices in first trimester

We know we have answered questions on anti malarial choices in pregnancy before on this site but the sender wants us to be sure that

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Here comes the answer 63rd: The Dental patients

Here comes the answer 63rd: The Dental patients

Unless you want Mr.Lambe to become a monk after he might have experienced the disulfiram-like reaction associated with accumulation of acetaldehyde as a result of inhibition of dehydrogenase enzyme responsible for alcohol metabolism, we might just do well to

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Yakassai on the move

Yakassai on the move

Lastly, we find it imperative here to appeal to Your Excellency to redress the defects in the appointment of the Director General of NAFDAC in the

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World Health Day 2016

World Health Day 2016

The number of people living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults, with most living in developing countries. Factors driving this dramatic rise include overweight and obesity, WHO announced ahead of World Health Day.
WHO is marking its annual World Health Day (7 April), which celebrates the Organization’s founding in 1948, by issuing a call for action on diabetes. In its first “Global report on diabetes”, WHO highlights the need to step up prevention and treatment of the disease.
Health-promoting environments reduce risk factors
Measures needed include expanding health-promoting environments to reduce diabetes risk factors, like physical inactivity and unhealthy diets, and strengthening national capacities to help people with diabetes receive the treatment and care they need to manage their conditions.
“If we are to make any headway in halting the rise in diabetes, we need to rethink our daily lives: to eat healthily, be physically active, and avoid excessive weight gain,” says Dr Margaret Chan, WHO Director-General. “Even in the poorest settings, governments must ensure that people are able to make these healthy choices and that health systems are able to diagnose and treat people with diabetes.”
Diabetes is a chronic, progressive noncommunicable disease (NCD) characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose (blood sugar). It occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough of the insulin hormone, which regulates blood sugar, or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces.
Key findings from WHO’s “Global report on diabetes”
Among the key findings from the “Global report on diabetes” are:
The number of people living with diabetes and its prevalence are growing in all regions of the world. In 2014, 422 million adults (or 8.5% of the population) had diabetes, compared with 108 million (4.7%) in 1980.
The epidemic of diabetes has major health and socioeconomic impacts, especially in developing countries.
In 2014, more than 1 in 3 adults aged over 18 years were overweight and more than one in 10 were obese.
The complications of diabetes can lead to heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure and lower limb amputation. For example, rates of lower limb amputation are 10 to 20 times higher for people with diabetes.
Diabetes caused 1.5 million deaths in 2012. Higher-than-optimal blood glucose caused an additional 2.2 million deaths by increasing the risks of cardiovascular and other diseases.
Many of these deaths (43%) occur prematurely, before the age of 70 years, and are largely preventable through adoption of policies to create supportive environments for healthy lifestyles and better detection and treatment of the disease.
Good management includes use of a small set of generic medicines; interventions to promote healthy lifestyles; patient education to facilitate self-care; and regular screening for early detection and treatment of complications.
Global commitments to reduce diabetes
“Many cases of diabetes can be prevented, and measures exist to detect and manage the condition, improving the odds that people with diabetes live long and healthy lives,” says Dr Oleg Chestnov, WHO’s Assistant Director-General for NCDs and Mental Health. “But change greatly depends on governments doing more, including by implementing global commitments to address diabetes and other NCDs.”
These include meeting Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target 3.4, which calls for reducing premature death from NCDs, including diabetes, by 30% by 2030. Governments have also committed to achieving 4 time-bound national commitments set out in the 2014 UN General Assembly “Outcome Document on Noncommunicable Diseases”, and attaining the 9 global targets laid out in the WHO “Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of NCDs”, which include halting the rise in diabetes and obesity.
“Around 100 years after the insulin hormone was discovered, the “Global report on diabetes” shows that essential diabetes medicines and technologies, including insulin, needed for treatment are generally available in only 1 in 3 of the world’s poorest countries,” says Dr Etienne Krug, Director of WHO’s Department for the Management of NCDs, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention. “Access to insulin is a matter of life or death for many people with diabetes. Improving access to insulin and NCD medicines in general should be a priority.”
Global efforts are underway to make medicines, including for NCDs, more available and affordable. Commitments from world leaders, including the SDGs, the 2011 “UN Political Declaration on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases”, the 2014 UN General Assembly “Outcome Document on Noncommunicable Diseases”, and the work of the UN Secretary-General’s high-level panel on access to essential medicines are aimed at improving affordability and availability of essential drugs for people living with diabetes. read more

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Can you deliver 63rd: The Dental Patients

Can you deliver 63rd: The Dental Patients

Below are prescriptions that could come from a dental clinic for disseminated dental abscess infection

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Here comes the answer 62: HAART Pharmacist

Here comes the answer 62: HAART Pharmacist

And so in line with WHO recommendation, the prescription will have to be changed to...

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Can you deliver 6 2nd. ..The HAART Pharmacist

Can you deliver 6 2nd. ..The HAART Pharmacist

Wednesdays are our special clinic days for pregnant women 

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Do not compete with patent medicine dealers. ..PCN

Do not compete with patent medicine dealers. ..PCN

The Pharmacists Council

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Seven Places Scientists are Searching for New Drugs

Seven Places Scientists are Searching for New Drugs

On a cat’s nose, on a golf course,

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Agbaje,Adelusi,Okoye charges young Pharmacists

Agbaje,Adelusi,Okoye charges young Pharmacists

The Nigerian academy of pharmacy  on

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Here comes the answer 61st: menstrual mistake

Here comes the answer 61st: menstrual mistake

last monday, we met  Titi, who was about getting married and an issue of miscalculated menstrual calendar , she turned to her pharmacist and friend, who also turned to norethsterone.

Norethisterone, a progesterone is widely known as the period delay pill. It comes in handy and can be obtained OTC when ladies don’t want a messy red day to spoil their fun as in the case of Titi, her wedding and honey moon. Norethisterone tabs taken 5mg 3 times daily starting three days before the first day of period can delay period for as long as you take it but not exceeding 17days at which it is no longer safe. Period generally returns 3days after the last dose. read more

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Fake drug Production: A microbiologist gets 7 years jail term

The National Agency for Food, Drugs, Administration and Control, NAFDAC, on Wednesday, charged a

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